This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience on our website. Learn more.
Got It!

Colleges Need to Update 3-Point Line After NCAA Change

3-point line basketball game ncaa

In early 2019, the NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel announced it would be moving the 3-point line for men’s basketball back for the first time since 2008. The new line distance is 22 feet, 1 ¾ inches, which matches international courts.

The 3-point line debuted on college basketball courts in 1987, and while it was slow to be utilized, has since become a popular shot within the game. According to the NCAA, the 3-point shot accounted for 28.9% of points in college basketball as of 2008. Moving the line back will likely temporarily reduce that amount as players get acclimated to the new shot distance. College basketball audiences will see how the players adapt to the new parameters, adding another level of entertainment to the game.

NCAA’s reasoning for the change:

  • Open the lane to drive plays from the perimeter
  • Reduce prevalence of 3-point shots by making them more challenging
  • Assist in offense spacing by requiring defense to cover more court

How Does the 3-Point Line Change Impact Current Basketball Courts?

Division II and III schools will need to update their lines within the 2020-21 school year based on financial considerations. To get your court’s 3-point lines updated in time, contact us before the May 2021 deadline. The Division I deadline was in the 2019-2020 season.

Because painting new lines requires an experienced sports floor contractor to strip and reapply the lines within regulatory guidelines, this may be an opportunity for any other repairs or upgrades your school has been considering for your basketball court. Maybe it’s time to review all game lines or remove items. Learn more about our basketball flooring systems or contact us with any questions you have about improving the quality of your flooring.

new basketball court with 3-point line moved

Photo credit: F.J. Roberts Floors

Share this blog

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail